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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.
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London, United Kingdom

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The Economist

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

Language:

English


Episodes

The enemy of their enemy: the Kurds ally with Syria

10/14/2019
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Turkey’s violent strikes on north-eastern Syria came as swiftly as America’s withdrawal. The overwhelmed Kurds, once America’s staunch allies against Islamic State, now want protection from Syria’s Russian-backed forces. “Microfinance” experiments are intended to alleviate poverty, but in Sri Lanka one trial has gone badly wrong. And, why China’s 30m truckers aren’t the folk heroes they might be elsewhere. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:22:04

The Economist asks: Senna, Winehouse, Maradona—can a film reveal the person behind the myth?

10/11/2019
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In his trilogy of documentaries the filmmaker Asif Kapadia rejected the traditional tools of the trade. Instead, he painstakingly reconstructed the lives of Formula One champion Ayrton Senna, acclaimed singer Amy Winehouse and legendary footballer Diego Maradona almost entirely from archival footage. Anne McElvoy asks Kapadia whether this forensic approach reaches closer to the real person behind the myth. They talk about the difficulty of interviewing a champion of deceit and whether it...

Duration:00:27:04

PiS prize: Poland’s crucial election

10/11/2019
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It is at once a story of post-communist success and of populist threats to the rule of law by the governing Law and Justice (PiS) party. What direction will Poles choose for their country? Gay rights are few and far between in China, but couples have found protection in a little loophole in guardianship law. And, how Elvis Presley’s last flash in Las Vegas changed the city forever. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:22:40

Editor’s picks: October 10th 2019

10/10/2019
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A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the strange new rules of the world economy. (9:40) A long-feared clash between Turkey and Syria’s Kurds will have consequences across the Middle East. (17:00) And, a tale of adventure in a library of ice For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:28:05

Uncomfortable president: Trump’s stonewalling

10/10/2019
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The White House is stonewalling the impeachment inquiry. Could that hinder the Democrats’ ability to build a strong public case? We look at this year’s crop of Nobel prizes in the sciences and ask why, once again, all the winners are men. And, Japan’s government-led efforts to match lonely urbanites with rural folk. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:20:30

Babbage: The promise and peril of AI

10/9/2019
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Artificial intelligence—the technique of using data and algorithms to make decisions as well as (or better) than humans—is on track to become a mainstream technology, on a par with electricity or computing. But in order to flourish it needs to overcome several challenges. From privacy and market concentration, to safety and explainability. In this week’s show Kenneth Cukier speaks to some of the leading experts in the field about the benefits and risks of AI, and why it is so important that...

Duration:00:32:40

Sorry state: Kashmir on lockdown

10/9/2019
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Two months after India’s Hindu-nationalist government stripped the state of Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy, 7m people are still in limbo. How will it end? Could America’s angrily partisan politics be explained by a rise in loneliness? We visit the Midwest to find out. And, companies are going big on “financial wellness” initiatives for their employees. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:21:26

Money talks: How low can rates go?

10/8/2019
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Our economics editor, Henry Curr, explores why the global economy is behaving weirdly and how governments and central banks should respond. Also, can freer trade help address climate change? The Economist’s editor-in-chief, Zanny Minton-Beddoes, asks Jacinda Ardern, the prime minister of New Zealand, Cecilia Malmström, the EU’s trade commissioner, Michael Corbat, CEO of Citigroup, and Tidjane Thiam, CEO of Credit Suisse, at the Bloomberg Global Business Forum. And, how the economics of...

Duration:00:28:40

Just a Kurd to him: Trump’s Syria withdrawal

10/8/2019
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The president’s sudden talk of departure from a contested strip of the Turkey-Syria border betrays the Kurds who helped beat back Islamic State—and risks throwing the region into chaos. A look at the cashew industry in Mozambique reveals the tricky trade-offs between agriculture and development. And, an unusual opera outlining the life and letters of birth-control pioneer Marie Stopes. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:22:23

Trade disunion: America’s tariff wars

10/7/2019
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Chinese and American trade negotiators will again be trying to avoid more eye-watering tariffs this week; meanwhile a years-long dispute with the European Union has sparked yet more levies. Where does it all end? We describe the recent “quantum supremacy” result, and what it realistically means for computing’s future. And, the coming submersion of 12,000 years of human history in Turkey. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:23:35

The Economist asks: Did Margaret Thatcher pave the way for Brexit?

10/4/2019
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Britain’s relationship with Europe dominated the last years of Margaret Thatcher’s premiership. Anne McElvoy asks Charles Moore, a Conservative columnist and her authorised biographer, whether the roots of Brexit can be traced back to the Iron Lady’s fierce tussles over British sovereignty. They talk about the machinations of her inner circle during her final years in power and her pioneering climate advocacy. Also, the “nightmare” of managing Boris Johnson, and what really happened at those...

Duration:00:30:22

Duty call: how Ukraine sees the Trump scandal

10/4/2019
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A phone call between the presidents has sparked an impeachment inquiry in America. But how do the people of Ukraine view the kerfuffle? Massive student protests put Indonesia’s president in a bind, balancing his programme of reforms and growth against uncomfortable social pressures. And, a revealing read through the Democratic presidential contenders’ autobiographies. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:22:48

Editor’s picks: October 3rd 2019

10/3/2019
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A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, computers will increasingly call the shots in financial markets. (10:00) China’s nationalism is the world’s problem. (17:30) And, how to reinforce the border wall with a gator-infested moat For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:24:33

Immunisation shot? The case against Binyamin Netanyahu

10/3/2019
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Political deadlock in Israel is now inextricably intertwined with a case against the prime minister. An eventual coalition could provide him with immunity, or could seal his political fate. The signature social reform of Emmanuel Macron, France’s president, faces furious opposition—but it might be even more risky for him not to pursue it. And, South Korea’s beauty industry has gone global, even as its biggest cosmetics retailer struggles. For information regarding your data privacy, visit...

Duration:00:20:30

Babbage: Steak and Chips

10/2/2019
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As the trade war intensifies, China wants to reduce its reliance on imports of foreign computer chips. Could open-source technology solve its problems? Also, new research on red meat pits statisticians against nutritionists. And Brad Smith, president of Microsoft, on the ethical dilemmas that come from powerful new technology. Kenneth Cukier hosts ____________________ Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio...

Duration:00:29:54

Reform over function: Peru’s political crisis

10/2/2019
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A long-running dispute between the president and the opposition-controlled Congress has spun out of control—and it’s not clear who will end up leading the country. A visit to a protest camp in coal-country Kentucky is a revealing look into several of America’s divides. And, why India has ended up with a 7m-tonne pile of sugar. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:22:54

Money talks: WeWorry

10/1/2019
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WeWork has scrapped plans for an initial public offering after its CEO stepped down amid claims of mismanagement. What does its implosion mean for investors and other young firms with similar ambitions? Greece's new government is preparing to announce its first draft budget. Will it be enough to re-energise the economy? Plus, a taste of Chinese fine wine. Patrick Lane hosts For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:24:12

Party like it’s 1949: China’s National Day

10/1/2019
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As at the founding of the People’s Republic, the 70th anniversary featured a tightly controlled parade bristling with the country’s latest military kit. That marks a sharp contrast to the growing chaos in Hong Kong, where a protest spirit has sparked new art, and an impromptu anthem. And, we ask if hot-desking costs employees more than companies are saving. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:20:24

The world ahead: A different dystopia

9/30/2019
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With recent protests taking place against president Abdel-Fatah al-Sisi, The Economist’s foreign editor, Robert Guest, considers what might happen if Mr Sisi's regime collapses. We discuss the global cannabis revolution, as medical use opens the way to wider liberalisation. And, instead of worrying about too many robots in the workforce in the future, should we be worrying that there will be too few? Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0) ____________________ Please subscribe...

Duration:00:25:57

Out-of-office messaging: Britain’s Tory conference

9/30/2019
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Lawmakers are back in Parliament while the ruling party is elsewhere, laying out its legislative mission. The Tories are divided, more scandals are arising and the only consistent message is “Get Brexit done”. We meet a Georgian film-maker whose love story challenges the country’s socially conservative mores. And, how young people’s blood may hold secrets that can halt ageing. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:23:26